Posts Tagged ‘ELONJ’

10 Powerful Statements Made at the ‘Anytime, Anywhere’ Legislative Summit on Afterschool and Summer Learning

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

Co-sponsored by NJSACC and NJ Principals and Supervisors Association, this informative summit was hosted on October 1, 2013 by Assemblywoman Mila Jasey and featured wonderful speakers such as Dr. Terry Peterson from After School Alliance, Massachusetts State Senator Thomas McGee, Lauren Heintz from the National Council of State Legislatures, Dr. Mary Reece from NJPSA and many notable others.

The following quotes represent only some of the powerful statements made during this valuable legislative summit surrounding expanded learning opportunities or “ELO”:

  • “ELO’s strength is also our achilles heel. We have lots of great people doing great things.”
  • “How do you roll out quality systems? Very carefully.”
  • “It is not enough to provide access, we have to improve quality.”
  • “At least 445,000 kids in NJ that live in communities eligible for 21st CCLC funding are without programming because of a lack of funds.”
  • “If you don’t have program quality, you can’t have increased gains in positive behaviors, attendance and academics.”
  • “The first step to Career and College Readiness is graduating high school. We all too often forget this step.”
  • “ELO can help strengthen school, community, family partnerships to support students in all of those places.”
  • “ELO/OST can address factors for increased student success in all topics.”
  • “NJ has 1.4 million students in public school. 450k are in low income neighborhoods. More families are working.”
  • “Afterschool programs naturally support the school day through their support of Common Core and the Habits of the Mind.”

ELO/Summer Learning Symposium: Transcripts and Top 10 Powerful Statements

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

ELO/Summer Learning Symposium
Join Our Discussion on Twitter at #ELONJ

The ELO/Summer Learning Symposium was an extremely enlightening and informative experience. On behalf of NJSACC, thank you all for attending our ELO/Summer Learning Symposium on April 24, 2013.

If you weren’t able to attend and would like to read the transcript from keynote speaker Adrian K. Haugabrook, Ed.D.’s address, please click here.

Lastly, take a moment and check out the top 10 powerful statements made  at the ELO/Summer Learning Symposium:

“Learning happens in a variety of environments.”
“Reading 3-4 books in the summer produces learning gains with access to books that match ability, interest and comprehension.”
“Summer reading can not only stem summer learning loss, but can lead to student achievement gains!”
“The three “I” words important to summer and all ELO: individualized, integrated, intentional.”
“Keys to summer program success: high quality staff, aligning school year and summer curricula, including content beyond remediation, data. . .”
“It is critical to teach the kids to be independent learners.”
“Students can learn all the time. . . with us or despite us.”
“ELO is a strategy for rethinking the time and learning continuum for students.”
“ELO should include intentional planning with the school day.”
“The more time spent in an ELO program, the greater the impact on youth, academics and behavior. . .”

For more info, read our twitter feed:
http://twitter.com/#ELONJ

Top 5 Powerful statements already made at the ELO/Summer Learning Symposium #ELONJ

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

ELO/Summer Learning Symposium
Join Our Discussion on Twitter at #ELONJ

The ELO/Summer Learning Symposium has gotten off to a fantastic start, but if you aren’t able to join us face to face today, join our discussion on Twitter using our hashtag #ELONJ. In the meantime, check out the top 5 powerful statements already made this morning:

“It is critical to teach the kids to be independent learners.”
“Students can learn all the time. . . with us or despite us.”
“ELO is a strategy for rethinking the time and learning continuum for students.”
“ELO should include intentional planning with the school day.”
“The more time spent in an ELO program, the greater the impact on youth, academics and behavior. . .”