Archive for May, 2008

ALERT!

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

FROM ACNJ:
Contact New Jersey’s Decision Makers on May 28th and 29th and Tell Them that Medicaid Co-pays are Wrong for New Jersey!

Medicaid beneficiaries have extremely limited incomes. Their financial struggles are even more difficult with the increasing costs of food, gas and home energy. If co-pays for prescription medications are enacted, these individuals will struggle even more. They will be forced to make possibly life-threatening choices between getting needed medicines and paying for other necessities, such as food. Co-pays must be removed from the FY 2009 State budget to truly give these individuals the coverage they need, to prevent their health from deteriorating and to avoid the resulting high costs, which the State will need to pay, of emergency room visits and hospitalizations.

On May 28th and 29th Pick up the phone and call the following New Jersey Leadership!

Governor Jon S. Corzine (609) 292-6000

Legislative Leadership
Senate President Richard Codey (973) 731-6770
Assembly Speaker Joseph Roberts (856) 742-7600
Senate Majority Leader Stephen Sweeney (856) 251-9801

Assembly Budget Committee
Assemblyman Louis Greenwald – Chair (856) 435-1247
Assemblyman Gary Schaer – Vice Chair (973) 249-3665
Assemblyman John Burzichelli (856) 251-9801
Assemblyman Joseph Cryan (908) 624-0880
Assemblyman Gordon Johnson (201) 541-1118
Assemblywoman Nellie Pou (973) 247-1555
Assemblywoman Joan Quigley (201) 217-4614
Assemblyman Joseph Vas (732) 324-5955
Assemblywoman Marcia Karrow (908) 782-5127
Assemblyman Joseph Malone (609) 298-6250
Assemblywoman Alison Littell McHose (973) 300-0200
Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon (732) 933-1591
Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee
Senator Barbara Buono – Chair (732) 205-1372
Senator Paul Sarlo – Vice Chair (201) 804-8118
Senator Brian Stack (201) 330-3233
Senator M. Teresa Ruiz (973) 484-1000
Senator Joseph Vitale (732) 855-7441
Senator Sandra Cunningham (201) 451-5100
Senator Dana Redd (856) 225-9068
Senator Shirley Turner (609) 530-3277
Senator Anthony Bucco (973) 627-9700
Senator Leonard Lance (908) 788-6900
Senator Philip Haines (609) 654-1498

ACNJ’s Make Kids Count NJ is aimed at making children’s issues a top priority for New Jersey’s state leaders.
We may be contacted at 35 Halsey Street Newark, N.J. 07102
Tel. (973) 643-3876 or via email at info@acnj.org

Tick Re-Post

Tuesday, May 27th, 2008

Tick Safety

May 24th, 2008

It is that beautiful time of year-the children have less homework, it is warmer, and the sun sets long after your program closes the door for the night. But be aware of the following:

NJ Department of Health and Senior Services

RELEASE: May 23, 2008
Health and Senior Services Commissioner Heather Howard encourages those spending time outdoors to be alert for signs and symptoms of Lyme disease

Ticks that transmit Lyme disease are most active in May, June and July so Health and Senior Services Commissioner Heather Howard recommends that New Jersey residents spending time outdoors be alert for the signs and symptoms of this tick-borne disease and take preventive measures.Lyme disease is a bacterial infection spread through a bite of an infected deer tick.

First discovered in Lyme, Connecticut in 1975, it is the most frequently reported tick-borne disease in the U.S.

New Jersey has the nation’s third highest number of Lyme disease cases reported to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with an average of 2,665 cases confirmed annually. Lyme disease is found throughout New Jersey’s 21 counties.

To protect themselves from tick bites, people should avoid tick-infested areas such as tall grass and dense vegetation; keep grass cut and underbrush thinned in yards and follow directions carefully if chemicals are used for tick control.

People should also wear protective clothing such as solid, light-colored clothing to help spot ticks. Tucking pants into socks also will help prevent a tick from attaching to your skin. Use of insect repellent—for people and pets—is also recommended, along with a full-body exam after leaving tick habitat.

“Reducing exposure to ticks is the best way to protect yourself and your family against Lyme disease,’’ said Health and Senior Services Commissioner Heather Howard. “As children spend more time outdoors and the summer camp season approaches, it is important for parents and camp counselors to remember to perform daily “tick checks” on their children and themselves.’’

One to two weeks after being infected, a “bull’s-eye” rash can develop at the tick bite site accompanied by flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, and muscle or joint pain. The disease can be treated with antibiotics if caught early and antibiotic therapy for three to four weeks is generally effective. However, left untreated cases can lead to musculoskeletal, neurological and cardiac problems.

In recognition of the need to raise awareness and understanding of methods for prevention and control of Lyme disease, the Governor Jon Corzine issued a Proclamation declaring May Lyme Disease Awareness Month.

Anyone who is bitten by a tick carrying the bacteria can get Lyme disease. It is important to properly remove a tick from the skin within 48 hours of being bitten in order to reduce the risk of disease transmission.

To safely remove a tick if you are bitten:

Use fine-pointed tweezers:
Grasp the tick’s mouth parts close to the skin.
Apply steady outward pressure.
Do not use petroleum jelly, noxious chemicals, or hot objects to remove ticks. Improper removal can increase the chances of infection.
In nature, the Lyme disease bacteria exist in a life cycle involving ticks, small animals and deer. Deer ticks live in dense woods with leaf litter, a thick undergrowth of shrubs and small trees. Immature ticks, most active spring and early summer, are typically found low to the ground. They are spread in the wild by animals such as birds, mice, raccoons and deer, but domestic animals such as cats, dogs, horses and cows can also carry infected ticks closer to, and even into the home.

For more information about Lyme disease, please visit: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/Lyme/

Tick Safety

Saturday, May 24th, 2008

It is that beautiful time of year-the children have less homework, it is warmer, and the sun sets long after your program closes the door for the night. But be aware of the following:

NJ Department of Health and Senior Services

RELEASE: May 23, 2008
Health and Senior Services Commissioner Heather Howard encourages those spending time outdoors to be alert for signs and symptoms of Lyme disease

Ticks that transmit Lyme disease are most active in May, June and July so Health and Senior Services Commissioner Heather Howard recommends that New Jersey residents spending time outdoors be alert for the signs and symptoms of this tick-borne disease and take preventive measures.Lyme disease is a bacterial infection spread through a bite of an infected deer tick.

First discovered in Lyme, Connecticut in 1975, it is the most frequently reported tick-borne disease in the U.S.

New Jersey has the nation’s third highest number of Lyme disease cases reported to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with an average of 2,665 cases confirmed annually. Lyme disease is found throughout New Jersey’s 21 counties.

To protect themselves from tick bites, people should avoid tick-infested areas such as tall grass and dense vegetation; keep grass cut and underbrush thinned in yards and follow directions carefully if chemicals are used for tick control.

People should also wear protective clothing such as solid, light-colored clothing to help spot ticks. Tucking pants into socks also will help prevent a tick from attaching to your skin. Use of insect repellent—for people and pets—is also recommended, along with a full-body exam after leaving tick habitat.

“Reducing exposure to ticks is the best way to protect yourself and your family against Lyme disease,’’ said Health and Senior Services Commissioner Heather Howard. “As children spend more time outdoors and the summer camp season approaches, it is important for parents and camp counselors to remember to perform daily “tick checks” on their children and themselves.’’

One to two weeks after being infected, a “bull’s-eye” rash can develop at the tick bite site accompanied by flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, and muscle or joint pain. The disease can be treated with antibiotics if caught early and antibiotic therapy for three to four weeks is generally effective. However, left untreated cases can lead to musculoskeletal, neurological and cardiac problems.

In recognition of the need to raise awareness and understanding of methods for prevention and control of Lyme disease, the Governor Jon Corzine issued a Proclamation declaring May Lyme Disease Awareness Month.

Anyone who is bitten by a tick carrying the bacteria can get Lyme disease. It is important to properly remove a tick from the skin within 48 hours of being bitten in order to reduce the risk of disease transmission.

To safely remove a tick if you are bitten:

Use fine-pointed tweezers:
Grasp the tick’s mouth parts close to the skin.
Apply steady outward pressure.
Do not use petroleum jelly, noxious chemicals, or hot objects to remove ticks. Improper removal can increase the chances of infection.
In nature, the Lyme disease bacteria exist in a life cycle involving ticks, small animals and deer. Deer ticks live in dense woods with leaf litter, a thick undergrowth of shrubs and small trees. Immature ticks, most active spring and early summer, are typically found low to the ground. They are spread in the wild by animals such as birds, mice, raccoons and deer, but domestic animals such as cats, dogs, horses and cows can also carry infected ticks closer to, and even into the home.

For more information about Lyme disease, please visit: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/Lyme/

Grant

Thursday, May 22nd, 2008

Youth Garden Grants Program

Help children develop a love of gardening while learning about the environment and the connection between food and nutrition. The National Gardening Association and Home Depot are sponsoring the Youth Garden Grants Program. Priority of awarding grants will be given to programs that emphasize one or more of the following elements: educational focus or curricular/program integration; nutrition or plant-to-food connections; environmental awareness/education; entrepreneurship; and the social aspects of gardening, such as leadership development, team building, community support or service-learning.

Applicants must plan to garden with at least 15 children who are between the ages of 3 and 18. The application deadline is Nov. 1. For more information or to download an application, go to:http://www.kidsgardening.com/YGG.asp

Code of Ethics

Thursday, May 22nd, 2008

May 21, 2008
The National AfterSchoool Association (NAA) has drafted The Code of Ethics for the Afterschool Professional.

NAA is now conducting a peer review of this document.
This peer review is essential in crafting a document that is reflective of the afterschool field at large while remaining true to the intent of guiding the afterschool professional when ethical dilemmas occur. As an afterschool professional, your comments are very valuable.
We would like to invite you to go to www.naaweb.org and click on Help us create a Code of Ethics for the Afterschool field to view the NAA Code of Ethics for the Afterschool Professional. Once you have read the document please give us your feedback by clicking on the survey link and taking this brief 5 minute survey. You comments will be reviewed by the NAA Code of Ethics Committee and a revised document will be given to the NAA board for approval.
Thank you for your time. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at coe@naaweb.org.

Sincerely,

National AfterSchool Association