Archive for January, 2008

SPAN CONFERENCE

Friday, January 25th, 2008


On Saturday, March 1, join us at this year’s conference, “Strengthening Families-Building Communities,” celebrating SPAN’s 20th year of empowering parents to be partners in the education and well-being of our children.
In addition to a variety of action-oriented workshops, this year’s conference will feature forums with our state’s leading policymakers in the areas of education, health, mental health and child abuse prevention.The conference will be held at the Sheraton Eatontown (NJ) from 8:30am-4:30pm.

Register today at: www.spannj.org/conference.

Also, there are a limited number of spaces available for exhibits. You will find information on reserving a space on the web site.

Finally, if you are not able to attend, please consider making a donation to support the attendance of parents/caregivers who might not be able to take advantage of this learning and networking opportunity because of financial constraints.

Thank you for your support. We look forward to seeing you there.

Debra Jennings
Executive Co-Director
Statewide Parent Advocacy Network, Inc.

Correction to Rutgers Post

Thursday, January 24th, 2008

Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences , at Rutgers University  , New Brunswick, NJ

Announces  a  Minor in Professional Youth Work (19-21 Credits)

The certificate program is intended to expand career options for students, whatever their majors may be. Employment opportunities include human services, community development, youth programs in public, private, nonprofit and for-profit organizations, and teaching opportunities in a variety of environmental education/science centers and non-school settings. The certificate is administered through the Education Program in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences.

The program addresses the growing need for educated professionals to work with youth in structured organizations. There are about 3,800 local, state, and national organizations in the United States that focus on the development of youth, some of which are “prevention” oriented while others utilize “intervention” strategies. Eleven of the major national youth organizations serve some 25 million youth, provide full-time employment for over 30,000 staff members, and offer more than 3,000 job openings annually.

The certificate program includes academic and experiential learning and draws upon educational pedagogy, sociology, and psychology to prepare students to address complex problems in youth, family and community services. More specifically, the program, which is interdisciplinary and applied in nature, provides a foundation in (a) individual and family development and functioning in the community and societal context; (b) contemporary issues facing youth, families and communities; and (c) policies and programs designed to prevent or alleviate concerns related to youth development and family issues. Students also acquire, in conjunction with the School’s general education requirements and leadership development opportunities, critical intervention skills in interpersonal communication, program planning, leadership, social policy, applied research and evaluation and community-based education.

For further information, contact Rebecca Jordan, 209 Waller Hall, 932-732-932-9164, scilearn@rci.rutgers.edu.

Rutgers Announces Certificate in Youth Work!

Thursday, January 24th, 2008

Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences , at Rutgers University  , New Brunswick, NJ

Announces  a  Minor in Professional Youth Work (19-21 Credits)

The certificate program is intended to expand career options for students, whatever their majors may be. Employment opportunities include human services, community development, youth programs in public, private, nonprofit and for-profit organizations, and teaching opportunities in a variety of environmental education/science centers and non-school settings. The certificate is administered through the Education Program in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences.

The program addresses the growing need for educated professionals to work with youth in structured organizations. There are about 3,800 local, state, and national organizations in the United States that focus on the development of youth, some of which are “prevention” oriented while others utilize “intervention” strategies. Eleven of the major national youth organizations serve some 25 million youth, provide full-time employment for over 30,000 staff members, and offer more than 3,000 job openings annually.

The certificate program includes academic and experiential learning and draws upon educational pedagogy, sociology, and psychology to prepare students to address complex problems in youth, family and community services. More specifically, the program, which is interdisciplinary and applied in nature, provides a foundation in (a) individual and family development and functioning in the community and societal context; (b) contemporary issues facing youth, families and communities; and (c) policies and programs designed to prevent or alleviate concerns related to youth development and family issues. Students also acquire, in conjunction with the School’s general education requirements and leadership development opportunities, critical intervention skills in interpersonal communication, program planning, leadership, social policy, applied research and evaluation and community-based education.

For further information, contact Rebecca Jordan, 209 Waller Hall, 932-732-932-9164, scilearn@rci.rutgers.edu.

Question On Food Delivery Service

Thursday, January 24th, 2008

What food delivery service do you use for your programs?

Catholic Charities is looking for feedback on what food delivery
services other programs are utilizing for before/after school programs
in NJ.   We currently use one food service and would like to change to a
new vendor that is reasonable in price and will deliver right to our
office or sites.  Please respond to Krista Glynn, Assistant Division
Director at kglynn@ccdom.org with any suggestions.  Thank you for your
feedback.

Commissioner Kevin Ryan Stepping Down

Thursday, January 24th, 2008

 

 This just arrived from DCF, a loss for NJ -we appreciate all work he did!

Dear Colleagues,

I write this afternoon to share with you that I am stepping down
as commissioner of the Department of Children and Families at the
end of February.

Over the past 6 years, it has been my great privilege to serve
New Jersey and partner with you to make a difference in the lives
of children, youth and families. I am particularly grateful to
Governor Jon Corzine for his friendship and trust, and most
especially his deep and abiding commitment to the children and
families we serve. He has been there time and again for us as we
labored to give birth to real and lasting reform. That work is
far from over and there is hard work ahead, but it has now taken
hold in an  unprecedented fashion, with record achievements in
adoptions, new foster families, caseload reductions, and
expansions in new behavioral health services and new family
success programs across the state. I have enormous confidence
that the leadership team and staff at DCF will carry on the
reform with community leaders with the same focus and skill they
have exhibited repeatedly.

I remain passionate about our kids’ future, and am eager to
continue to improve conditions for children through the Amelior
and MCJ Foundations, which I will join in March. Their
philanthropy focuses on improving the lives of children most
at-risk, particularly in Newark and Africa. Internationally, the
Foundation is concentrating on the eradication of malaria through
Malaria No More, an organization it helped create. I am ready and
eager to help in these vital efforts as I begin a new chapter in
life.

Please know that I so appreciate all you have done for children
and families – truly. Our kids have such wonderful advocates in
you – together, we can continue to build for them the bright
future they deserve.

Best regards,

Kevin Ryan
Commissioner
Department of Children and Families