Archive for December, 2007

NJSACC HOLIDAY WISHES

Monday, December 17th, 2007

Hello Afterschool Flash ,

Everyone @ NJSACC has sent you an origami holiday card.
To view your card, click the link below:

CLICK HERE

SAFE KIDS WALK

Monday, December 10th, 2007

Safe Kids Worldwide and program sponsor FedEx created Safe Kids Walk This Way to teach safe behavior to motorists and child pedestrians and create safer, more walkable communities. 

GO TO:  http://www.usa.safekids.org/wtw/index.html

 

In December of 1967……Everything changed

Monday, December 10th, 2007

In December of 1967……Everything changed

Passage Theatre’s State Street Project will present its first performance of the 2007-2008 season, Urban Central by David White, Dec. 14-16, 2007.

A new play written and directed by David White, Urban Central is inspired by true stories from Trenton High School (THS) graduates. After performing extensive research into events at Trenton High School during the turbulent school year of 1967-1968, Mr. White contacted and interviewed several Trenton High School alumni about their experiences. Urban Central focuses on a longtime urban high school teacher who plans to transfer to a suburban school, but is first forced to come to terms with her own past as a student there, during the race riots of 1967-1968.

Following the Saturday matinee at 3 pm and the Saturday night performance at 7pm, Kidsbridge is presenting a panel of THS graduates or other Trentonians who lived through these turbulent times. There are still openings on the panel. If you would like to share your experience and would like to enjoy the play for FREE for you and one guest, pls respond to this email or contact Lynne Azarchi (see below). Thanks in advance.

About Passage Theatre
Passage Theatre is Trenton’s premiere professional theatre, in residence at the historic Mill Hill Playhouse.

To Go
All performances take place at the historic Mill Hill Playhouse at Front and Montgomery streets in Trenton. Performances: Fri., Dec. 14, 7 p.m.;
Sat., Dec. 15, 3 and 7 p.m.; Sun., Dec. 16, 3 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Reservations are recommended; call the box office at (609) 392-0766.
Limited parking is available on the street surrounding the playhouse; for driving or public transportation directions, visit www.passagetheatre.org.
 
Lynne Azarchi
Executive Director
Kidsbridge Children’s Museum
www.kidsbridgemuseum.org

609-581-0239

Running Vacation Club at the end of December?

Monday, December 10th, 2007

Great idea from the Community Children’s Museum

COMMUNITY CHILDRENS MUSEUM

973-366-9060

Jmarkis348@aol.com

 Get ready for December Vacation with your Winter Break Survival Kit that you can create at the Community Children’s Museum, 77 E Blackwell St, Dover starting Monday December 24th from 10am to 2:30pm. All ages are welcome for special activities and crafts during vacation week. Make your kit with 3D Snowflakes, art and science projects, templates for airplanes, boxes and drawing tricks and much more to entertain yourself for the whole vacation. Hours for the week are Monday, Dec. 24, 10am – 2:30pm, Closed Tuesday Dec. 25, Open Wed. Dec. 26 thru Sat. Dec. 29, 10am – 5pm, Sunday Dec. 30, 12-5pm, Monday, Dec. 31, 10am – 2:30pm, and even Tuesday, New Year’s Day, Jan. 1st  from 1pm to 5pm!
 The Community Children’s Museum is a non profit organization where children can explore and learn through hands on fun in art, science and world cultures.  The Museum’s regular hours are Thursday thru Saturday 10am to 5pm, Sunday 12-5pm and admission is $5 per person 6 months and older and $4 for seniors.  Funding for the museum has been made possible in part by the Arts Council of the Morris Area through the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.  For more information call (973) 366-9060 or email us at ccmuseum@gmail.com. Visit www.communitychildrensmuseum.org.       

 Driving Directions to Community Children’s Museum

From Rt. 10 west, Right exit Salem St. towards Dover.  Continue straight on Salem St. passing K-mart; go over the bridge to the end.  At light make a Left onto E. Blackwell St. Museum is about ¼ mile up on Right, just before Bergen St. light.  Next to POLLOS PUCALOR restaurant.  The building is bright yellow, park on the side under the colorful mural on the side of the building in our parking lot.  Free parking also the on street. 

Gang Awareness: If you think it can’t happen to you you’re wrong

Friday, December 7th, 2007

 Every year at the NJSACC Conference we host a workshop :

“Gang Awareness: If  you think it can’t happen to you You’re Wrong” 
NJSACC is committed to building awareness in all communities.
Here’s the proof-no matter where your program is located, gangs are everywhere.

Quiet Cranford abuzz over a neighbor’s arrest
Resident called five-star general in heroin operation run by Bloods gang
Friday, December 07, 2007
BY BRAD PARKS
Star Ledger
 On a quiet Cranford Street lined with inflatable Santas, well- trimmed shrubs and other markers of suburban comfort, the house on the corner of Dietz Street and Lud low Avenue didn’t stand out too much.The owners, a couple with young children, were quiet and kept to themselves. The man commuted to work each day, just like the other dads in the neighborhood. On weekends, folks would see him washing his car.The only thing that made 201 Dietz St. just slightly unusual — other than being the largest and nicest house on the block — were the interior walls visible from the street. Neighbors could see them at night, illuminated by a large chandelier in the foyer.They were painted a deep and penetrating red.On a quiet Cranford Street lined with inflatable Santas, well- trimmed shrubs and other markers of suburban comfort, the house on the corner of Dietz Street and Lud low Avenue didn’t stand out too much.The owners, a couple with young children, were quiet and kept to themselves. The man commuted to work each day, just like the other dads in the neighborhood. On weekends, folks would see him washing his car.The only thing that made 201 Dietz St. just slightly unusual — other than being the largest and nicest house on the block — were the interior walls visible from the street. Neighbors could see them at night, illuminated by a large chandelier in the foyer.They were painted a deep and penetrating red.”I just thought they liked the color red,” said Bob Cosenza, a neighbor who has been living on the street for close to 30 years. “They seemed like normal people.”

On a quiet Cranford Street lined with inflatable Santas, well- trimmed shrubs and other markers of suburban comfort, the house on the corner of Dietz Street and Lud low Avenue didn’t stand out too much.The owners, a couple with young children, were quiet and kept to themselves. The man commuted to work each day, just like the other dads in the neighborhood. On weekends, folks would see him washing his car.The only thing that made 201 Dietz St. just slightly unusual — other than being the largest and nicest house on the block — were the interior walls visible from the street. Neighbors could see them at night, illuminated by a large chandelier in the foyer.They were painted a deep and penetrating red.”I just thought they liked the color red,” said Bob Cosenza, a neighbor who has been living on the street for close to 30 years. “They seemed like normal people.”Or at least they did until early Wednesday morning, when law enforcement agents raided the house, carried out $50,000 in cash and a semiautomatic handgun and arrested its owner, Abdullah Meyers.

A three-year investigation by the Drug Enforcement Agency, the IRS and the State Police fingered Meyers as the top lieutenant in a $2 million-a-month heroin ring that operated in Newark and the sur rounding area. Authorities described Meyers as a five-star general in the Bloods gang.

And for the past two years, he had been living with his red walls — the color of the Bloods street gang — amidst accountants, firemen and retirees on Dietz Street.

“You’d never think a five-star general would be living in Cran ford,” said Doug Collier, a spokesman for the Newark field office of the Drug Enforcement Agency. “But the problem of gangs and drugs is one that crosses all boundaries.”

Meyers and the alleged leader of the ring, Rasheem Small, have been charged with conspiracy to distribute one kilogram or more of heroin and conspiracy to conceal drug proceeds. Meyers also ordered home invasions and shootings of rival drug dealers, according to a confidential informant cited in the complaint, who allegedly witnessed those orders carried out.

Meyers and Small face life in prison if convicted. The house on Dietz Street, allegedly bought with the proceeds of a vigorous drug and money-laundering operation, will likely be seized by the U.S. At torney’s Office.

A man who answered the door of the house yesterday said no one there wanted to comment on the allegations. But the neighbors were buzzing.

“A drug dealer? I can’t believe it,” said Connie Gall, who spends the day watching her grandchildren just up the street. “I walked the kids past there in their strollers all the time when they were infants. It’s a very peaceful neighborhood.”

Dietz Street was first developed in the 1950s and retains a post- World War II feel even now that some of the original houses have been torn down and replaced with larger versions. The street is narrow, with a 25 mph speed limit and no sidewalks. The cars motoring past on the Garden State Parkway a few blocks away provide only the faintest background noise.

There are a smattering of Mercedes and Audis in the driveways, but most of the cars are more prac tical: Fords, Nissans and Toyotas. The yards are neat — there seems to be a preference for rhododen drons — and several of the houses proudly fly American flags.

Meyers’ house is one of the tear- downs. It was rebuilt about five years ago with a three-car garage, brick façade and tan siding. The landscaping is tasteful — ornamen tal grasses, sculpted shrubbery, rock borders — and meticulous.

“They did a lovely job keeping the house,” Gall said. “The lawn was always freshly mowed.”

Neighbors said they often saw Meyers with expensive cars — according to the criminal complaint against him, his fleet included a $178,000 Lamborghini and a Mercedes-Benz SUV — but that didn’t attract excess attention in a well-to-do suburb.

“I just assumed he had a very good job,” Cosenza said. “You’d see the fancy cars, but everyone has fancy cars these days. I thought maybe he was just a car collector.”

Meyers didn’t interact with his neighbors much. None of the six neighbors interviewed yesterday reported having an extended conversation him. The only noise coming from the house was when one of the kids had a birthday party. And even those were quiet, neighbors said.

None of the neighbors had an inkling the man living on their street was a man authorities said had millions of dollars of drug money sitting in various bank accounts.

“When you think about it, it makes sense,” said Tony LaFer rara, who has lived on Ludlow Street for 50 years. “If you’ve got all that money, you’re not going to live in Newark are you? This neighborhood was probably perfect for him.”