Archive for February, 2007

Homework: What is it good for?

Wednesday, February 28th, 2007

The Center for Public Education is offering an online discussion on
homework tomorrow afternoon at 2:00 pm EST, and we thought it might
be of interest to you.

For more information about the Center for Public Education, you may
visit their website at
http://www.centerforpubliceducation.org

Center for Public Education Online Discussion – Homework: What is it good for?

Homework has gone in and out of fashion since the 19th
century. Does it help or hamper student learning? Do kids get too
much or not enough?

Parents, teachers, and policymakers struggle with these and other
questions about homework. Get answers at the Center for Public
Education’s next live chat:

Homework: What is it Good For?
Thursday, March 1, 2007
2 p.m. EST

Find out what research says about the value of homework.

Submit questions now or during the session and join the chat the by
visiting
http://discussions.centerforpubliceducation.org

A Closer Look at Asian-American Achievement

Wednesday, February 28th, 2007

Live Online Chat: A Closer Look at Asian-American Achievement

When: Thursday March 1, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern time.Where: http://enews.edweek.org/GoNow/a15864a161769a226521815a2

Submit questions in advance here:
http://enews.edweek.org/GoNow/a15864a161769a226521815a1

Please join us Thursday March 1, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern time for a live Web chat to talk about the academic performance of Asian-American students.

When it comes to academic achievement, it is indisputable that, as a group, Asian-American students outperform their African-American and Latino peers on every measure. By most measures, they also beat white students.

But another truth, much less acknowledged in education and policy circles, is that the story of Asian-American achievement is a complicated one. The oft-cited data that portray a diverse community of students as uniformly successful ignore the experiences of many students. In fact, in the ongoing debate about student achievement, discussion of Asian-American students, whether stellar or struggling, is often absent.

What about closing the “top gap,” between the most outstanding Asian-American students and their white classmates? Why aren’t educators and policymakers talking about low-achieving Asian-American students, who they are, and what should be done to help them catch up? And what effect does the widely held assumption that all Asian-Americans do well in school regardless of social class or ethnic background–the “model minority” stereotype–have on students across the achievement spectrum?

Guest:
Don T. Nakanishi, director, UCLA Asian-American Studies Center

Read this related article:
The ‘Other’ Gap
http://enews.edweek.org/GoNow/a15864a161769a226521815a0

Submit questions in advance here:
http://enews.edweek.org/GoNow/a15864a161769a226521815a1

Join us for this important discussion.

Last Day To Register is Feb.28th!

Tuesday, February 27th, 2007

 

Saturday, March 3, 2007
AFTERSCHOOL REGIONAL TRAINING DAY #2

 NJSACC is launching the 2nd of our series of 4 Regional Workshops.

The cost is $20 for 3 hours of staff training.  All will begin at 9am on a Saturday and end at 12:15pm.
Our next Regional Training Day will be:

  Saturday, March 3, 2007
AFTERSCHOOL REGIONAL TRAINING DAY #2

Date:  March 3, 2007
Time:  8:30am-12:15pm
Place:  La Casa de Don Pedro, 23 Broadway, Newark, NJ  07104
Cost:  $20
Agenda:
8:30am-9am – Registration and Continental Breakfast
9am-10:30am – Session 1
10:45am-12:15pm – Session 2
Session 1 – 9am-10:30am
A. Teambuilding for Staff and Kids
Come fill your toolbox with a few nuts and bolts activities and strategies to build stronger staff teams and groups of kids.  Activities are hands-on, so come prepared to play!
Presenter: Dagmar Wojcik, Trainer, NJSACC
B.  Crafts, Crafts, Crafts!
In this fun Workshop you will get to learn a variety of crafts and craft ideas and take home your new creations!
Presenter: Adrienne Mtume, Trainer, NJSACC
C.  Behavior Management
We all have difficult situations and behaviors that can be hard to manage.  Many issues and problems can be handled by making changes to the afterschool environment.  Learn tips and strategies to put the necessary supports in place to make positive changes in your program!
Presenter:  Christine Corriston, LIC SW, Trainer, NJSACC

D.  Hands-On Science                                                                                                                                  

Science experiments can be a fun way to introduce new activities into your afterschool program.  In this workshop you will get ideas for projects that will engage your children and keep them having fun!
Presenter:  Sarah Cruz, Trainer, NJSACC

Session 2 – 10:45am-12:15pm

E. Teambuilding for Staff and Kids
Come fill your toolbox with a few nuts and bolts activities and strategies to build stronger staff teams and groups of kids.  Activities are hands-on, so come prepared to play!
Presenter: Dagmar Wojcik, Trainer, NJSACC
F.  Crafts, Crafts, Crafts!                                                                                                                                     

In this fun Workshop you will get to learn a variety of crafts and craft ideas and take home your new creations!
Presenter: Adrienne Mtume, Trainer, NJSACC
G.  Behavior Management
We all have difficult situations and behaviors that can be hard to manage.  Many issues and problems can be handled by making changes to the afterschool environment.  Learn tips and strategies to put the necessary supports in place to make positive changes in your program!Presenter:  Christine Corriston, LIC SW, Trainer, NJSACC

H.  Hands-On Science  Experiments can be a fun way to introduce new activities into your afterschool program. 

 In this workshop you will get ideas for projects that will engage your children and keep them having fun!
Presenter:  Sarah Cruz, Trainer, NJSACC

*****************************************************************
REGISTRATION FORM PLEASE FAX TO: 908.789.4237
SEND ONE FORM PER PERSON
DUPLICATE AS NEEDED
 *****************************************************************
Name:
Address:
City:                                                      State:     Zip:    
Day Phone:
Afterschool Program:
Number of youth served:
***************************************************************
 SESSION CHOICES**Please circle one choice for each session
Session 1 – 9am-10:30am

A. Teambuilding for Staff and Kids
B.  Crafts, Crafts, Crafts!
C.  Behavior Management
D.  Hands-On Science
Session 2 – 10:45am-12:15pm

E. Teambuilding for Staff and Kids
F.  Crafts, Crafts, Crafts!
G.  Behavior Management
H.  Hands-On Science
 
***************************************************************
Cost: $20 per person
Make checks payable to NJSACC.
PO’s and Credit Cards accepted.
Amount enclosed:
Check Number/ or Purchase Order Number #:
OR
Credit Card #:
Visa___ MasterCard___ Expiration Date____________
Name on Card:
Zip Code for Credit Card Billing Address_______________

**************************************************************
FAX REGISTRATION FORM TO: 908.789.4237 Mail payment with original registration form to:
NJSACC
231 North Avenue West #363
Westfield, NJ 07090
All Registrations must be received by February 28, 2007
All Payment must be mailed to the address above and received by date of training.
Substitutions may be made at any time.  There are no refunds will be given after Feb. 28th regardless of attendance.
NO WALK IN REGISTRATIONS, PLEASE !

 

 

TechGYRLS

Monday, February 26th, 2007

TechGYRLS

Designed to give girls ages 9-13 a chance to explore the world of computers and to awaken their interest at an early age so that they will be able to take advantage of technology-learning opportunities in high school and college, as well as to help them consider jobs in these areas for their careers. Especially geared to low-income minority girls. Class size is limited to 12-14 girls who are active in YWCA programs.

The YWCA of Plainfield , NJ is part of this exciting national project.  For more information contact

Yolanda Fuller-McCloud at yfullermccloud@ywcacnj.org, or (908) 756-3500 x126.


YWCA’s TechGYRLS prepares participants for computer-dominated world

BYLINE: Dawn Klingensmith, Chicago Tribune

How do you get 24 girls who have just wrapped up a six-hour school day to sit still for more learning on a Friday after-noon?
Barbara Burton knows the answer: Put them in front of computers.
Burton supervises the YWCA Metropolitan Chicago’s new TechGYRLS club, designed to help girls from low-income families develop technical skills and encourage them to consider careers in computer technology.
Over the course of several weeks in the fall, Burton — who has worked in computer technology since 1980 — taught the girls that computers are portals to new worlds and endless possibilities.
In one project, the girls viewed online retail sites and used computer software to design their dream bedrooms.
“They navigated the Internet to find furniture,” Burton said. “I encouraged them to dream big.”
The girls did just that, downloading images of plasma televisions and whirlpool tubs to incorporate in their designs.
“I found three beds that I liked, so I bought them all,” said Kyla Sipp, 8.
But computers aren’t just portals to online shops.
“Our hope is that exposing girls to technology early in life will give them the tools, confidence and increased earn-ing potential they’ll need for a brighter future,” said Judith Lites Nelson, director of economic empowerment services for YWCA Metropolitan Chicago.
TechGYRLS — a national YWCA program developed in 1997 and offered in Chicago for the first time in Septem-ber — aims to increase the number of women in computer science and information technology careers and to narrow the digital divide that persists between communities that have access to information technology and those that do not, Nel-son said.
“Technology is something that’s going to become bigger and bigger, in every aspect of our lives,” she said. “There are lots and lots of opportunities for boys to be exposed to technology, but girls are being left behind.”
The TechGYRLS curriculum is designed so girls with limited exposure to technology will see its relevance to their lives and take to it immediately, Nelson added.
The dream bedroom project acquaints girls with several computer programs and skills. Participants are given an imaginary budget of $20,000, and they track their expenditures using Microsoft Office Excel spreadsheets.
The girls search the Internet for downloadable photos of furniture, electronic components, linens and accessories. They also may use drawing software to create their own furnishings. They draw bedroom layouts and then digitally paste their furnishings in place.
Ari Gary, who participated in the inaugural TechGYRLS club from October through December, was thrilled to dis-cover that in the virtual world, it doesn’t matter if retailers don’t offer furnishings in her favorite color.
“With the computer,” said Ari, 8, “I learned how to change the color of” furniture to whatever she wants.
Other projects include animating five-day weather forecasts and using animation, fixed images and sound to create autobiographies.
The program culminates with a day of project presentations, which helps the girls hone their public speaking skills.
Timia Strickland, 10, applied her new computer skills right away.
“My mom and dad went to computer classes, but all they learned how to do is make documents,” she said. “So I went home and taught them how to use the Internet.”
Girls in 4th through 6th grades may enroll in the free program by submitting a parental consent form and attending a mandatory orientation. Two 14-week sessions will be offered each year at the Salvation Army Building at 945 W. 69th St., Chicago. The current session began in January, and the next will be offered in September. The program is open to anyone, and the YWCA hopes to expand it in fiscal year 2008, said Sarah Frick, a YWCA spokeswoman.
Sessions are limited to 24 girls — two clubs with 12 girls each — and each girl works on her own computer.
The clubs meet for two hours on Mondays and Wednesdays or Tuesdays and Thursdays, and on Fridays most or all of the girls attend optional “open lab” periods to work on projects.
The program receives funding from the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity; Microsoft Corp.; and the Motorola and Sara Lee Foundations.
– – –
Women make up nearly half the workforce but account for less than 27 percent of computer and mathematics pro-fessionals. { +1} Girls ages 15 to 17 are more likely than their male peers to use e-mail, instant messaging and text mes-saging. { +2} In 2000, girls accounted for 17 percent of college-bound students who took the computer science Ad-vanced Placement Exam. { +3} In 2004, women received 17 percent of computer science bachelor’s degrees, down from 19 percent in 2000. { +4} Thirty-six percent of African-American households had Internet access in 2003, com-pared with the national average of nearly 55 percent. { +5} 1. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2006 Current Population Survey. 2. They’re also more likely to use Internet search engines to find information about certain topics, including health, spirituality and entertainment, according to the 2005 report “Teens and Technology,” issued by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. The report was based on a 2004 survey of 1,100 teens and their par-ents. 3. According to the American Association of University Women. 4. According to the Computing Research Asso-ciation. 5. According to the 2003 Current Population Survey.

Travel Reimbursements for Multi-Site Directors

Monday, February 26th, 2007

The Work Family Connection, Inc. is in the process of instituting a policy on travel reimbursements for multi-site directors since they travel from site to site on an ongoing basis. They would appreciate knowing how your organization handles this. Do you reimburse for travel expenses for multi-site directors/supervisors? Do you reimburse for mileage or gas? How much? How do you track their expenses? Do they have to submit a mileage log or receipts?

Please respond to apipeling@theworkfamilyconnection.org.