New Jersey School-Age Care Coalition - the Network for New Jersey's Afterschool Communities
Quality Standards

Self-Assessment Rubric: Administration

Performance Levels
Rate your afterschool program in each of the indicators using the following system:

  • Performance Level 1: Needs Improvement/Standard Not Met
  • Performance Level 2: Some Progress Made/Approaching Standard
  • Performance Level 3: Satisfactory/Meets Standard
  • Performance Level 4: Excellent/Exceeds Standard

A quality afterschool program should strive to meet Performance Level 3 on all quality indicators.

1. The program has and uses a mission statement.

a. The program has a written mission statement that sets forth the program's primary purposes.

  • Performance Level 4: The mission statement is clearly written. Program staff, parents and youth know and understand the program mission. The mission statement is posted visibly in multiple locations at the program site and is regularly used in program materials, such as brochures or posters.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has a written mission statement. Many, but not all, program staff, parents and youth are aware of the mission statement. The mission statement is not posted visibly at the program site and/or is inconsistently used in program materials such as brochures or posters.
  • Performance Level 2: The program has a written mission statement. However, it is not posted visibly. Awareness of the mission is low among program staff, parents and youth.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not have a mission statement.

b. The mission statement guides administrative decisions about the program, including decisions about curriculum, staffing, and policy.

  • Performance Level 4: The program's mission always guides administrative decisions about the program, including about curriculum, staffing, and policy. Potential staff members are asked multiple questions regarding experience, qualities, and beliefs that are directly connected to the mission statement. The site director regularly communicates the importance of understanding, embracing, and demonstrating awareness of the mission statement. Staff members are expected to incorporate the mission into their work, through daily performance, planned activities, and communications with youth, families, staff members, and supervisors.
  • Performance Level 3: The program's mission generally guides administrative decisions about the program, including about curriculum, staffing, and policy. Potential staff members are informed of the mission during the interview process. The site director communicates the importance of understanding and demonstrating awareness of the mission statement at orientation training, but not throughout the program year. Many staff members incorporate the mission into their work.
  • Performance Level 2: The program's mission inconsistently guides administrative decisions about the program. Staff are informed of the mission statement, but not of its importance. Few staff members incorporate the mission into their work.
  • Performance Level 1: The mission statement is never used to guide administrative decisions about the program, including decisions about curriculum, staffing, and policy.

c. All staff are aware of the mission statement.

  • Performance Level 4: All staff are aware of the mission statement. Staff members understand and can clearly articulate the mission statement and how it guides the program. Staff members are asked to sign a statement demonstrating their commitment to follow the mission of the organization. Employee handbooks contain a written version of the mission statement and the mission statement is visibly posted in multiple locations at the program site.
  • Performance Level 3: Staff are aware of the mission statement. Most staff members understand and can clearly articulate the mission statement. Employee handbooks contain a written version of the missions statement and the mission statement is posted at the program site.
  • Performance Level 2: Some staff are aware of the mission statement, but most cannot clearly articulate it or how it guides the program. The mission statement does not appear in employee handbooks or posted at the program site.
  • Performance Level 1: Staff are not aware of the mission statement.

2. The administration takes steps to facilitate continuous improvement in program quality

a. The administration oversees the development of program goals and objectives.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration develops clear program goals and objectives. Goals and objectives are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound. All program activities are designed to support program goals and objectives. The administration actively involves staff, youth, families and other stakeholders in the process of developing and evaluating goals and objectives.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration develops clear program goals and objectives. Goals and objectives are specific and measurable. Staff members meet to discuss the goals and objectives and understand how program activities support the goals and objectives.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration develops program goals and objectives. However, the goals and objectives may be vague, hard to measure, or disconnected from program needs. Some staff members are aware of the program goals and objectives.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not develop programs goals or objectives.

b. The administration conducts an internal monitoring or evaluation system to continuously improve program quality.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration conducts an internal monitoring or evaluation system annually. The administration works in partnership with staff, youth, families, and other key stakeholders to develop a program evaluation plan. The plan includes collecting both quantitative and qualitative data. There is a plan for reporting evaluation results to key stakeholders and for using the results for future program planning.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration conducts an internal monitoring or evaluation system annually. Staff have input into this process. There is a plan for reporting evaluation results to key stakeholders and for using the results for future program planning.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration conducts an internal monitoring or evaluation system. However, evaluations may occur irregularly or informally and may vary greatly over time.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not conduct an internal monitoring or evaluation system.

c. The administration incorporates input and feedback from program stakeholders as central components of the quality improvement process.

  • Performance Level 4: Feedback from all program stakeholders, including youth, families, and school and community partners, is a central component of the quality improvement process. The administration communicates the importance of stakeholder feedback to all key stakeholders and there is a high level of participation. Stakeholders have multiple opportunities throughout the year to provide feedback. Stakeholders receive copies of any reports or plans developed as part of the quality improvement process.
  • Performance Level 3: Feedback from program stakeholders, including youth, families, and school and community partners is included in the quality improvement process. Stakeholders are given one opportunity each year to provide feedback. Participation levels may vary between the program stakeholder groups.
  • Performance Level 2: Feedback from program stakeholders is on an ad hoc basis. There is no formal process to collect feedback from program stakeholders.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not incorporate input and feedback from program stakeholders in the quality improvement process.

3. The administration offers staff the best possible working conditions and pay

a. The program offers staff paid preparatory time.

  • Performance Level 4: The program has a policy about paid preparatory time that clearly outlines how and when staff may utilize paid preparatory time. The administration emphasizes the importance of preparatory time and encourage staff to utilize it.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has a policy about paid preparatory time that clearly outlines how and when staff may utilize paid preparatory time.
  • Performance Level 2: The program has no policy on paid preparatory time. Some staff may advocate for their own paid preparatory time. Performance Level 1: The program does not offer staff paid preparatory time.

b. The program facilitates opportunities for additional training that is related to a staff person's professional growth plan, including paying for outside training if appropriate.

  • Performance Level 4: The program regularly facilitates opportunities for additional training that is related to a staff person's professional growth plan, including paying for outside training if appropriate. The administration stays abreast of professional development opportunities and regularly shares them with staff, encouraging participation.
  • Performance Level 3: The program regularly facilitates opportunities for additional training that is related to a staff person's professional growth plan, including paying for outside training if appropriate.
  • Performance Level 2: The program inconsistently facilitates opportunities for additional training for staff. Some staff may advocate for these opportunities.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not facilitate opportunities for additional training related to a staff person's professional growth plan.

c. Staff have opportunities to discuss their own concerns regarding the program.

  • Performance Level 4: Staff have opportunities to discuss their own concerns regarding the program. The program has a policy that outlines how staff should voice their concerns. Staff are regularly encouraged to share any concerns they may have. The program has a culture of open communication and collaborative problem-solving, which encourages all staff to share concerns as they may arise.
  • Performance Level 3: Staff have opportunities to discuss their own concerns regarding the program. The program has a policy that outlines how staff should voice their concerns.
  • Performance Level 2: Staff have opportunities to discuss their own concerns regarding the program, but there is no policy and some staff may not feel comfortable doing so.
  • Performance Level 1: Staff do not have opportunities to discuss their own concerns regarding the program.

d. Staff have opportunities within the program for self-direction, decision-making, and developing long-term program plans and vision.

  • Performance Level 4: Staff always have opportunities within the program for self-direction, decision-making, and developing long-term program plans and vision. The administration actively encourages staff to participate in program planning and most staff participate in these efforts on a regular basis.
  • Performance Level 3: Staff have opportunities within the program for self-direction, decision-making, and developing long-term program plans and vision. The administration encourages staff participation in program planning and some staff participate.
  • Performance Level 2: Staff have limited opportunities within the program for self-direction, decision-making, and developing long-term program plans and vision. The administration does not encourage staff to participate in program planning.
  • Performance Level 1: Staff do not have opportunities within the program for self-direction, decision-making, and developing long-term program plans and vision.

e. There are policies and procedures in place to give positive feedback and recognize the contributions of staff members.

  • Performance Level 4: There are policies and procedures in place to give positive feedback and recognize the contributions of staff members. The administration regularly recognizes staff members who make positive contributions to the program and to celebrate significant happenings at the program. The administration encourages a culture of appreciation.
  • Performance Level 3: There are policies and procedures in place to give positive feedback and recognize the contributions of staff members. Staff are regularly recognized for their contributions to the program.
  • Performance Level 2: Staff receive positive feedback and recognition in an ad hoc way and there are no policies and procedures to formalize this process.
  • Performance Level 1: There are not policies and procedures in place to give positive feedback and recognize the contributions of staff members.

4. The administration provides a high quality system of professional development

a. The administration conducts an ongoing assessment of the program's professional development needs and evaluation of the professional development offerings.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration conducts an ongoing assessment of the program's professional developments needs and evaluation of the professional development offerings. This assessment includes input from staff, as well as other program stakeholders. This assessment takes into consideration the needs of new as well as long-time employees, as well as specific interests of staff members.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration conducts an ongoing assessment of the program's professional development needs and evaluation of the professional development offerings. This assessment takes into consideration the needs of new as well as long-time employees, as well as specific interests of staff members.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration conducts an assessment of the program's professional development needs and evaluation of the professional development offerings less than once per year.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not conduct an ongoing assessment of the program's professional development needs and evaluation of the professional development offerings.

b. The administration develops an annual professional development plan with a timeline.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration develops an annual professional development plan and with a timeline. Staff are aware of the professional development opportunities planned throughout the program year. Professional development occurs at regular intervals throughout the program year. The plan features a mix of opportunities that will appeal to new as well as long-time staff. Professional development is recognized as a critical component to a high-quality program.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration develops an annual professional development plan and with a timeline. Staff are aware of the professional development opportunities planned throughout the program year. Professional development occurs at regular intervals throughout the program year.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration develops an annual professional development plan, but this plan may lack a timeline. Staff are not aware of the professional development opportunities planned. Professional development opportunities occur infrequently; for example, they may occur only at the beginning of the school year and/or after the winter break.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not develop an annual professional development plan with a timeline.

c. The administration uses qualified, experienced trainers and/or evidence-based training materials for professional development.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration always uses qualified, experiences trainings and evidence-based training materials for professional development. When hiring outside trainers, the administration always reviews the credentials of prospective trainers and ensures they are registered with Professional Impact NJ. The administration ensures that training materials are evidence-based and regularly searches for newly released training materials.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration uses qualified, experienced trainers and/or evidence-based training materials for professional development. When hiring outside trainers, the administration always reviews the credentials of prospective trainers. The administration ensures that training materials are evidence-based.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration inconsistently uses qualified, experienced trainers and/or evidence-based training materials for professional development.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not use qualified, experienced trainers and/or evidence-based training materials for professional development.

d. Professional development at the program includes mentoring and on-going, job-embedded learning in addition to formal training opportunities.

  • Performance Level 4: Professional development at the program always includes mentoring and on-going, job-embedded learning in addition to formal training opportunities. Some examples: the administration will pair a long-time staff member with a new hire to encourage mentoring. To supplement a formal trainings on a curricula, staff may shadow another staff person as they lead activities with program youth. When a staff person attends a conference on behavior management, they share the info with their colleagues and model behavior management techniques they use with program youth.
  • Performance Level 3: Professional development at the program sometime includes mentoring and on-going, job-embedded learning in addition to formal training opportunities.
  • Performance Level 2: Professional development at the program inconsistently includes mentoring and on-going, job-embedded learning in addition to formal training opportunities.
  • Performance Level 1: Professional development at the program does not include mentoring and on-going, job-embedded learning in addition to formal training opportunities.

5. The administration manages volunteers effectively

The program has plans for recruiting, orienting, training, supervising, and recognizing volunteers. The plan may be the same as what the program does for paid staff at times, but the program has a distinct plan when needed. Note: Standards related to staff conduct in the Human Relationships and Special Needs/The Whole Child categories should apply to volunteers.

  • Performance Level 4: The program has formal, written policies and procedures for orienting, training, supervising, and recognizing volunteers. Volunteers are regularly utilized to enhance the program. The administration actively recruits volunteers who may include high school age or college students, seniors, or other civic leaders.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has formal, written policies and procedures for orienting, training, supervising, and recognizing volunteers. The plan may be the same as what the program does for paid staff at times, but the program has a distinct plan when needed.
  • Performance Level 2: The program has formal, written policies and procedures for orienting, training, supervising, and recognizing volunteers, but does not utilize them consistently.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not have formal plans for recruiting, orienting, training, supervising, and recognizing volunteers.

6. The administration takes steps to support effective communication

a. There are policies or procedures in place that support effective and frequent communication between program staff and families. For example, the program may have a practice of calling the homes of a few families each week for regular check-ins.

  • Performance Level 4: There are clear policies or procedures in place that support effective and frequent communication between program staff and families. For example, the program may have a practice of calling the homes of a few families each week for regular check-ins. The program utilizes newsletters, flyers, email communication, social media or other means to communicate with families. Program families are always up to date on happenings at the program. The Site Director has an ‘door policy', encouraging communication with individual families.
  • Performance Level 3: There are policies or procedures in place that support effective and frequent communication between program staff and families. For example, the program may have a practice of calling the homes of a few families each week for regular check-ins. The program may utilize newsletters, flyers, email communication, social media or other means to communicate with families. Most program families are up to date on happenings at the program.
  • Performance Level 2: The program has policies or procedures that support effective and frequent communication between program staff and families, but they are inconsistently used. Communication may be ad-hoc or infrequent. Program families are often unaware of happenings at the program.
  • Performance Level 1: The program lacks policies or procedures that support effective and frequent communication between program staff and families

b. There are policies or procedures in place that support positive communication between program staff and families. For example, the administration sets the expectation that staff communicate with parents for positive reasons and not just when there is a problem or the program needs information.

  • Performance Level 4: The program has policies and procedures in place that support frequent positive communication between program staff and families. The administration works to build a culture of support and celebration. The administration encourages program staff to communicate with parents in a variety of methods including verbal and written communications, always in the appropriate language and literacy level. Communication between program staff and families is ongoing.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has policies and procedures in place that support frequent positive communication between program staff and families. The administration encourages program staff to communicate with parents in a variety of methods including verbal and written communications. Communication between program staff and families is frequent.
  • Performance Level 2: The program may lack policies or procedures in place that support positive communication between program staff and families OR communication between program staff and families is limited to discussions about illness or behavioral challenges.
  • Performance Level 1: The program lacks policies or procedures in place that support positive communication between program staff and families. Communication between program staff and families is limited to discussions about illness or behavioral challenges.

c. There are policies or procedures in place that support effective communication between program staff and the host agency or other community stakeholders, if applicable.

  • Performance Level 4: The program has clear policies or procedures in place that support effective communication between program staff and the host agency or other community stakeholders, if applicable. The program communicates with the host agency and other community stakeholders on a scheduled and as needed basis.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has policies or procedures in place that support effective communication between program staff and the host agency or other community stakeholders, if applicable. The program communicates with the host agency and other community stakeholders on an as needed basis. Performance Level 2: The program either lacks policies or procedures in place that support effective communication between program staff and the host agency or other community stakeholders OR has policies and procedures that are inconsistently utilized.
  • Performance Level 1: The program lacks policies or procedures in place that support effective communication between program staff and the host agency or other community stakeholders, if applicable.

d. Program policies and procedures support effective communication among program staff. This includes effective communication between administrative staff and non-administrative staff. For example, administrative staff use one-on-one and face-to-face communications with non-administrative staff as well as group meetings and written communication.

  • Performance Level 4: Program policies and procedures support effective communication among program staff. This includes effective communication between administrative staff and non-administrative staff. For example, administrative staff use one-on-one and face-to-face communications with non-administrative staff as well as group meetings and written communication. This communication happens on a regular basis.
  • Performance Level 3: Program policies and procedures support effective communication among program staff. This includes effective communication between administrative staff and non-administrative staff. For example, administrative staff use one-on-one and face-to-face communications with non-administrative staff as well as group meetings and written communication. This communication happens at certain points throughout the program year.
  • Performance Level 2: Program policies and procedures support effective communication among program staff but are infrequently utilized.
  • Performance Level 1: The program lacks policies and procedures in support of effective communication among program staff.

7. The administration values input and feedback about the program and is responsive to it.

a. The program uses formal and informal methods to seek feedback and input from youth and families.

  • Performance Level 4: The program regularly uses formal and informal methods to seek feedback and input from youth and families on a wide range of matters which may include programming, special events, fundraising efforts, strategic planning, and capital improvements. Formal methods may include surveys (electronic or paper) or suggestion box. Informal methods might include a suggestion box or conversation at pickup or dropoff times. Program staff at all levels regularly seek feedback from youth and families.
  • Performance Level 3: The program uses formal and informal methods to seek feedback and input from youth and families about the program. Formal methods may include surveys (electronic or paper) or suggestion box. Informal methods might include a suggestion box or conversation at pickup or dropoff times. The administration seeks feedback from youth and families at least once per year.
  • Performance Level 2: The program infrequently or inconsistently uses formal and informal methods to seek feedback and input from youth and families. Formal methods may include surveys (electronic or paper) or suggestion box. Informal methods might include a suggestion box or conversation at pickup or dropoff times.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not use formal and informal methods to seek feedback and input from youth and families.

b. There are procedures in place for the program to get input and feedback from the host agency or other community stakeholders, if applicable.

  • Performance Level 4: The program has procedures in place to get input and feedback from the host agency or other community stakeholders. All stakeholders are aware of the procedures and regularly provide input and feedback.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has procedures in place to get input and feedback from the host agency or other community stakeholders. All stakeholders are aware of the procedures and some provide input and feedback.
  • Performance Level 2: The program either lacks procedures in place to get input and feedback from the host agency or other community stakeholders, OR few stakeholders are aware of the procedure.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not have procedures in place to get input and feedback from the host agency or other community stakeholders.

c. The program is responsive to input and feedback from youth, families, the host agency, and other stakeholders.

  • Performance Level 4: The program actively asks for input and feedback from youth, families, the host agency, and other stakeholders. There is a process in place for each of these stakeholders to provide input and feedback. All stakeholders are aware of the process and regularly provide input and feedback.
  • Performance Level 3: The program is responsive to input and feedback from youth, families, the host agency, and other stakeholders. There is a process in place for each of these stakeholders to provide input and feedback.
  • Performance Level 2: The program is not responsive to input and feedback from youth, families, the host agency, and other stakeholders OR, there is no process in place for each of these stakeholders to provide input and feedback.
  • Performance Level 1: The program is not responsive to input and feedback from youth, families, the host agency, and other stakeholders. There is no process in place for each of these stakeholders to provide input and feedback.

d. The program involves staff, families, and youth in decision-making and planning.

  • Performance Level 4: The program always actively involves staff, families, and youth in decision-making and planning. There is a process in place for each of these stakeholders to participate in decision-making and planning. All stakeholders are aware of the process and regularly participate. Building a culture of collaborative decision-making and planning is important to the administration.
  • Performance Level 3: The program involves staff, families, and youth in decision-making and planning. There is a process in place for each of these stakeholders to participate in decision-making and planning.
  • Performance Level 2: The program lacks a process for stakeholder decision-making and planning. Stakeholders who advocate for themselves may participate in decision-making and planning.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not involve staff, families, and youth in decision-making and planning.

8. There are policies or procedures in place that involve families in the life of the program

a. Information for families is available in the language(s) the families speak, to the extent possible, and at the literacy level of most parents or guardians. The program also takes into account the unique communication needs of parents or guardians with special needs.

  • Performance Level 4: Information for families is always readily available in the language(s) commonly spoken by families in the community and at the literacy level of most parents or guardians. The administration quickly seeks translation services for prospective families that require information in a language other than those commonly used in the community. The program also takes into account the unique communication needs of parents or guardians with special needs and makes appropriate accommodations. Program information includes registration and welcome materials, as well as ongoing communication throughout the year including newsletters, flyers, email communication and social media.
  • Performance Level 3: Information for families is often available in the language(s) the families speak, to the extent possible, and at the literacy level of most parents or guardians. The program also takes into account the unique communication needs of parents or guardians with special needs. The administration always provides significant information such as registration, welcome and major announcements in the relevant language, literacy level or other accommodation, but may not always do so with other communications throughout the year.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration inconsistently provides information to families in the relevant language, literacy level or other accommodation.
  • Performance Level 1: Information for families is not available in the language(s) the families speak and at the literacy level of most parents or guardians. The program does not take into account the unique communication needs of parents or guardians with special needs.

b. The program offers orientation sessions for new families.

  • Performance Level 4: The program has an annual orientation session for new families. Existing program families are also encouraged to attend, both to learn more and to foster connections with new families. For families that register for the program mid-year, the administration provides for a one-on-one orientation session.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has an annual orientation session for new families.
  • Performance Level 2: The program has orientation materials for families, but does not offer an orientation session for families to ask questions, share concerns and to learn more about the program.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not offer orientation sessions for new families.

c. The program involves families in program events when possible, and there is a policy to welcome “drop-in” visits from family members to the program.

  • Performance Level 4: The program actively involves families in program events when possible, and there is a policy to welcome “drop-in” visits from family members to the program. The policy is posted visibly in the program and is included in the handbook. Program staff continually encourage families to attend special events, but also to stop by for an everyday activity.
  • Performance Level 3: The program involves families in program events when possible, and there is a policy to welcome “drop-in” visits from family members to the program. The policy is posted visibly in the program and is included in the handbook.
  • Performance Level 2: The program involves families in program events when possible, and there is a policy to welcome “drop-in” visits from family members to the program. However, the policy is not posted visibly in the program and is not included in the handbook. Staff do not actively encourage family members to visit the program.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not involve families in program events and there is not a policy to welcome “drop-in” visits from family members to the program.

9. The program respects the rights of the youth, family members, and staff

a. The program has an internal process that program applicants, participants, and stakeholders can use to express and resolve a grievance or complaint. The program communicates this process to the families of youth in the program and to program staff.

  • Performance Level 4: The program has an internal process that program applicants, participants, and stakeholders can use to express and resolve a grievance or complaint. The program communicates this process to the families of youth in the program and to program staff and encourages them to use utilize it when needed. When a grievance or complaint is raised, the process allows for a speedy resolution. The process itself is reviewed by all key stakeholders and they have input into revising the process if needed.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has an internal process that program applicants, participants, and stakeholders can use to express and resolve a grievance or complaint. The program communicates this process to the families of youth in the program and to program staff.
  • Performance Level 2: The program does not have a formal process for program applicants, participants, and stakeholders to use to express and resolve a grievance or complaint. Grievances and complaints are dealt with in an ad-hoc manner.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not have an internal process that program applicants, participants, and stakeholders can use to express and resolve a grievance or complaint. If grievances or complaints are raised, the program does not work to resolve them.

b. The program has and adheres to a policy of nondiscrimination, which is reflected in all program activities and communications.

  • Performance Level 4: The program has a policy of nondiscrimination and celebrates the diversity of its staff, families and community which is always reflected in program activities. The administration ensures that the program is welcoming of staff and youth of various races, ethnicities, and abilities.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has and adheres to a policy of nondiscrimination, which is reflected in all program activities and communications.
  • Performance Level 2:
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not have a policy of nondiscrimination and this may be reflected in program activities and communications.

c. The program does not release confidential information about youth without informed, signed authorization from the child or youth and the parent or legal guardian. When the law permits the release of confidential information without this authorization, the program at least informs youth and families of the release.

  • Performance Level 4: The program does not release confidential information about youth without informed, signed authorization from the child or youth and the parent or legal guardian. Even when the law permits the release of confidential information without this authorization, the program always informs youth and families of the release. The program has developed a formal policy around confidential data/information. The policy is shared with key stakeholders and is included in the handbook.
  • Performance Level 3: The program does not release confidential information about youth without informed, signed authorization from the child or youth and the parent or legal guardian. When the law permits the release of confidential information without this authorization, the program at least informs youth and families of the release. The program has developed a formal policy around confidential data/information.
  • Performance Level 2: The program does not release confidential information about youth without informed, signed authorization from the child or youth and the parent or legal guardian. When the law permits the release of confidential information without this authorization, the program at least informs youth and families of the release. The program lacks a formal policy around confidential data/information.
  • Performance Level 1: There are instances when the program has released confidential information about youth without informed, signed authorization from the child or youth and the parent or legal guardian. The program lacks a formal policy around confidential data/information.

10. The administration maintains and updates program policies and records

a. The administration maintains a parent handbook, an employee handbook, and a policies and procedures manual. This includes annually reviewing each of these documents and updating them as needed.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration maintains a parent handbook, an employee handbook, and a policies and procedures manual. This includes annually reviewing each of these documents and updating them as needed. Copies are always readily available in the relevant languages and literacy levels of program staff and families.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration maintains a parent handbook, an employee handbook, and a policies and procedures manual. This includes annually reviewing each of these documents and updating them as needed. Copies are always readily available.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration either does not maintain all of the following items: a parent handbook, an employee handbook, and a policies and procedures manual OR does not update them all annually.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration maintains a parent handbook, an employee handbook, and a policies and procedures manual.

b. The administration maintains youth and staff files and other important program records in an organized manner. The administration ensures individual records are checked at least two times a year and updated as needed.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration maintains youth and staff files and other important program records in an organized manner. The administration ensures individual records are checked at least two times a year and regularly and specifically reminds program and staff families to update information as it changes (such as cell phone number, employer or address).
  • Performance Level 3: The administration maintains youth and staff files and other important program records in an organized manner. The administration ensures individual records are checked at least two times a year and updated as needed.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration maintains youth and staff files and other important program records, but does not check them at least two times a year or update as needed.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not maintain youth and staff files and other important program records in an organized manner.

11. The administration acts responsibly regarding program finances and financial sustainability

a. The administration conducts sound financial management of the program, if applicable. If the program administration is not managing the program budget, then the administration maintains familiarity with the budget.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration always conducts sound financial management of the program. The program has a budget and continually tracks expenses and revenues. The budget is approved by the administration and is monitored throughout the year, including mid-year and year-end reports. Key stakeholders have access to the budget and have an understanding of how program resources are used.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has a budget and continually tracks expenses and revenues. The budget is approved by the administration and is monitored quarterly throughout the year, including a year-end report. Key stakeholders have access to the budget upon request.
  • Performance Level 2: The program has a budget and monthly tracks expenses and revenues. The budget is approved by the administration but monitoring is infrequent. Key stakeholders do not review the budget.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not conduct sound financial management of the program. The program may lack a budget and/or fails to track expenses and revenues. There is no financial oversight or system of accountability.

b. The program has an established process for collecting funds from parents, if applicable.

  • Performance Level 4: The program has an established process for collecting funds from parents, if applicable. This process is outlined in the parent handbook and is posted at the main site.
  • Performance Level 3: The program has an established process for collecting funds from parents, if applicable. This process is outlined in the parent handbook.
  • Performance Level 2: The program lacks an established process for collecting funds from parents, if applicable; however, the process may be unclear to some parents, causing confusion.
  • Performance Level 1: The program lacks an established process for collecting funds from parents, if applicable. Many parents are confused about the payment process.

c. The administration maintains awareness of multiple possible funding streams to support the program.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration always maintains awareness of multiple possible funding streams to support the program. This includes public, private foundation, local businesses, fundraising from program families, and parent fees. The administration periodically researches possible private and public funding streams and has capacity to write and develop grant proposals. The program has a fundraising committee that supports these efforts.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration generally maintains awareness of multiple possible funding streams to support the program. This includes public, private foundation, local businesses, fundraising from program families, and parent fees. The administration annually researches possible private and public funding streams and has capacity to write and develop grant proposals. The program has a fundraising committee that supports these efforts.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration infrequently maintains awareness of multiple possible funding streams to support the program. This includes public, private foundation, local businesses, fundraising from program families, and parent fees. The administration infrequently researches possible private and public funding streams and may lack the capacity to write and develop grant proposals. The program does not have a fundraising committee to support these efforts.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration is not aware of potential funding streams to support the program.

12. The administration maintains sufficient staff:youth ratios and supervision of youth

a. Ratios of staff to youth in the program should be between 1:10 and 1:15 when youth are age six and older. Ratios of staff to children should be between 1:8 and 1:12 when the program includes children who are age five. When possible, at least two staff members are with a group of youth that is in an isolated room.

  • Performance Level 4: Ratios of staff to youth in the program should be between 1:10 and 1:15 when youth are age six and older. Ratios of staff to children should be between 1:8 and 1:12 when the program includes children who are age five. At least two staff members are with a group of youth that is in an isolated room.
  • Performance Level 3: Ratios of staff to youth in the program should be between 1:10 and 1:15 when youth are age six and older. Ratios of staff to children should be between 1:8 and 1:12 when the program includes children who are age five. When possible, at least two staff members are with a group of youth that is in an isolated room.
  • Performance Level 2: The program infrequently operates with the following ratios: Ratios of staff to youth in the program should be between 1:10 and 1:15 when youth are age six and older. Ratios of staff to children should be between 1:8 and 1:12 when the program includes children who are age five. Infrequently, at least two staff members are with a group of youth that is in an isolated room.
  • Performance Level 1: The program never operates with the following ratios: Ratios of staff to youth in the program should be between 1:10 and 1:15 when youth are age six and older. Ratios of staff to children should be between 1:8 and 1:12 when the program includes children who are age five. Rarely, at least two staff members are with a group of youth that is in an isolated room.

b. There is a plan to provide adequate staff coverage in case of emergencies. This includes emergencies that require one staff member to tend to the needs of a single child, as well as situations in which on-duty staff members become ill or suffer from other emergencies.

  • Performance Level 4: There is a written plan to provide adequate staff coverage in case of emergencies. This includes emergencies that require one staff member to tend to the needs of a single child, as well as situations in which on-duty staff members become ill or suffer from other emergencies. As these emergencies arise, the plan is always implemented smoothly and adequate staff coverage is always maintained.
  • Performance Level 3: There is a written plan to provide adequate staff coverage in case of emergencies. This includes emergencies that require one staff member to tend to the needs of a single child, as well as situations in which on-duty staff members become ill or suffer from other emergencies. As these emergencies arise, the plan is generally implemented smoothly and adequate staff coverage is generally maintained.
  • Performance Level 2: There is a plan to provide adequate staff coverage in case of emergencies, but as these emergencies arise, implementation of the plan is problematic resulting in inadequate staff coverage.
  • Performance Level 1: There is no plan in place to provide adequate staff coverage in case of emergencies.

c. There is a plan to use substitute staff to maintain ratios when regular staff are absent. This includes keeping an up-to-date list of adults qualified to serve as substitutes, as well as providing support for and evaluation of substitutes to maintain quality.

  • Performance Level 4: There is a plan to use substitute staff to maintain ratios when regular staff are absent. When staff absences occur, the plan is always implemented smoothly and adequate staff coverage is always maintained.
  • Performance Level 3: There is a plan to use substitute staff to maintain ratios when regular staff are absent. When staff absences occur, the plan is generally implemented smoothly and adequate staff coverage is generally maintained.
  • Performance Level 2: There is a plan to use substitute staff to maintain ratios when regular staff are absent, but implementation of the plan is problematic resulting in inadequate staff coverage.
  • Performance Level 1: There is no plan to use substitute staff to maintain ratios when regular staff are absent.

d. The program plans for and provides different levels of supervision according to the type of activity as well as the ages and abilities of the youth.

  • Performance Level 4: The program always plans for and provides different levels of supervision according to the type of activity as well as the ages and abilities of the youth. The plan is always implemented smoothly.
  • Performance Level 3: The program plans for and provides different levels of supervision according to the type of activity as well as the ages and abilities of the youth. The plan is generally implemented smoothly.
  • Performance Level 2: The program plans for and provides different levels of supervision according to the type of activity as well as the ages and abilities of the youth. The plan is infrequently implemented smoothly.
  • Performance Level 1: The program does not plan for or provide different levels of supervision according to the type of activity as well as the ages and abilities of the youth.

13. The administration stays current on licensing and other relevant laws and regulations

a. The administration ensures the program follows any relevant laws and regulations, including state licensing standards.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration ensures the program follows any relevant laws and regulations, including state licensing standards. The administration always carefully reviews written or electronic communication from local or state agencies that may include changes to relevant laws and regulations.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration ensures the program follows any relevant laws and regulations, including state licensing standards.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration inconsistently ensure the program follows any relevant laws and regulations, including state licensing standards. There may be instances where the program is not in compliance with changes to laws or regulations.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not ensure that the program follows any relevant laws and regulations, including state licensing standards.

b. The administration ensures that the program follows the rules in the state licensing standards over the recommendations in this standards document if the licensing rules are more stringent.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration ensures that the program follows the rules in the state licensing standards over the recommendations in this standards document if the licensing rules are more stringent. When this occurs, the administration always seeks written clarification from the Office of Licensing and shares the response with key stakeholders, including families and host agency.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration ensures that the program follows the rules in the state licensing standards over the recommendations in this standards document if the licensing rules are more stringent.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration inconsistently ensures that the program follows the rules in the state licensing standards over the recommendations in this standards document if the licensing rules are more stringent.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration does not ensure that the program follows the rules in the state licensing standards over the recommendations in this standards document if the licensing rules are more stringent.

c. The administration is aware of changes that may come to relevant laws and regulations and other current issues related to laws and regulations that could impact the program.

  • Performance Level 4: The administration ensures that they are always up to date with relevant laws and regulations and other current issues related to laws and regulations that could impact the program. The administration always carefully reviews written or electronic communication from local or state agencies and works to quickly make programmatic or administrative changes to ensure compliance. The administration communicates these changes with stakeholders including program staff, families, host agency and others.
  • Performance Level 3: The administration is aware of changes that may come to relevant laws and regulations and other current issues related to laws and regulations that could impact the program. The administration carefully reviews written or electronic communication from local or state agencies and works to make programmatic or administrative changes to ensure compliance.
  • Performance Level 2: The administration is sometimes unaware of changes that may come to relevant laws and regulations and other current issues related to laws and regulations that could impact the program. There have been instances where the program is not in compliance with changes to laws or regulations.
  • Performance Level 1: The administration is not aware of changes that may come to relevant laws and regulations and other current issues related to laws and regulations that could impact the program. There may be lengthy periods of time where the program is not in compliance with changes to laws or regulations.

14. The administration researches and connects to potential community partners in order to facilitate staff, youth, and families taking advantage of community resources

a. The program administration researches services and resources within the community to which staff may refer families when appropriate and necessary. Examples are free dental screenings, fire-prevention seminars, parenting classes, health clinics, food programs, library services, language classes, counseling services, and crisis intervention services. The program administration translates this information to staff and ensures that the information is current and high-quality.

  • Performance Level 4: The program administration researches services and resources within the community to which staff may refer families when appropriate and necessary. Examples are free dental screenings, fire-prevention seminars, parenting classes, health clinics, food programs, library services, language classes, counseling services, and crisis intervention services. The program administration translates this information to staff and ensures that the information is current and high-quality. The program administration translates this information to staff and ensures that the information is current and high-quality. The program regularly ensures that their information on services and resources is up to date and available in the languages program families speak.
  • Performance Level 3: Each year, the program administration researches services and resources within the community to which staff may refer families when appropriate and necessary. Examples are free dental screenings, fire-prevention seminars, parenting classes, health clinics, food programs, library services, language classes, counseling services, and crisis intervention services. The program administration translates this information to staff and ensures that the information is current and high-quality.
  • Performance Level 2: The program administration has some information about services and resources to share with families, but this information may be limited, out-of-date, or unavailable in the languages spoken by program families.
  • Performance Level 1: The program administration does not refer families to services and resources within the community.

b. The program administration develops links with the community that staff may take advantage of when planning activities. Examples are activities that help children get to know the larger community, such trips to a library or visits from leaders and mentors in the community, as well as community service projects.

  • Performance Level 4: Program administration build a culture that emphasizes the importance of community. The program frequently takes advantage of community resources such as libraries, museums, parks, nature centers or the local historical society. Community leaders, such as government employees, elected officials or other civic leaders visit the program. The program sees itself as a member of the larger community and also gives back through community service projects. The program uses a service learning model to ensure that youth understand the value of their efforts.
  • Performance Level 3: The program takes advantage of community resources such as libraries, museums, parks, nature centers or the local historical society. Community leaders, such as government employees, elected officials or other civic leaders may visit the program. The program sees itself as a member of the larger community and also gives back through an annual community service project.
  • Performance Level 2: The program administration connects with the larger community in a minimal way, such as a one-off event.
  • Performance Level 1: The program administration does not develop links with the community.